Risk factors for non-communicable diseases related to obesity among first- and second-generation Bangladeshi migrants living in North-east or South-east England

Akhter, N, Begum, K, Nahar, P, Cooper, G, Vallis, D, Kasim, A and Bentley, G R (2021) Risk factors for non-communicable diseases related to obesity among first- and second-generation Bangladeshi migrants living in North-east or South-east England. International Journal of Obesity. ISSN 0307-0565

[img] PDF - Accepted Version
Download (1MB)
[img] PDF - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (655kB)

Abstract

Background
Obesity is a global burden, which significantly increases the risk of non-communicable diseases (NCDs). More than a quarter of adults in the United Kingdom are obese, but prevalence varies by ethnicity, and South Asians have the largest burden of NCDs. This paper assesses how sex, generation, and region interplay to vary the predisposition to obesity-related (OR) NCDs among UK Bangladeshis.

Methods
We used National Institute for Health and Care Excellence suggested grading for combining body mass index and waist circumference to define populations at risk of OR-NCDs. Data from 517 adults of Bangladeshi origin from a cross-sectional study (March 2013 to April 2015) were analysed. Male and female participants from London and north-east England were equally sampled including: (1) adult migrants, who came to the UK aged >16 years; (2) child migrants, who came to the UK aged ≤16 years; and (3) second-generation Bangladeshis (who were born and brought up in the UK). A generalised estimating equation using a binomial distribution and a logit link was used to explore the relationship between the binary outcome of being ‘at risk of OR-NCDs’ and associated factors.

Results
Females, married individuals, those living in London, the second-generation, and those of lower self-assessed financial status, with low acculturation status, or who did not walk daily for at least 20 min were more likely to develop OR-NCDs. A striking sex difference was found with more females prone to OR-NCD risk in the north-east than in London.

Conclusions
Our study observed important inter- and intra-regional inequality in OR-NCD risk which worsens the health of ethnic minorities and widens inequality.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: Brighton and Sussex Medical School > Global Health and Infection
SWORD Depositor: Mx Elements Account
Depositing User: Mx Elements Account
Date Deposited: 20 Apr 2021 07:04
Last Modified: 13 May 2021 12:45
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/98480

View download statistics for this item

📧 Request an update