Do some viruses use growth hormone, prolactin and their receptors to facilitate entry into cells?

Wallis, Michael (2021) Do some viruses use growth hormone, prolactin and their receptors to facilitate entry into cells? BioEssays, 43 (4). a2000268. ISSN 0265-9247

[img] PDF - Accepted Version
Restricted to SRO admin only until 2 February 2022.

Download (8MB)

Abstract

The molecular evolution of pituitary growth hormone and prolactin in mammals shows two unusual features: episodes of markedly accelerated evolution and, in some species, complex families of related proteins expressed in placenta and resulting from multiple gene duplications. Explanations of these phenomena in terms of physiological adaptations seem unconvincing. Here I propose an alternative explanation, namely that these evolutionary features reflect the use of the hormones (and their receptors) as viral receptors. Episodes of rapid evolution can then be explained as due to “arms races” in which changes in the hormone lead to reduced interaction with the virus, and subsequent changes in the virus counteract this. Placental paralogues of the hormones could provide decoys that bind viruses, and protect the foetus against infection. The hypothesis implies that the extensive changes introduced into growth hormone, prolactin and their receptors during the course of mammalian evolution reflect viral interactions, not endocrine adaptations.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: growth hormone, prolactin, placental lactogen, virus, arms race, episodic evolution, viral decoy
Schools and Departments: School of Life Sciences > Biochemistry
Subjects: Q Science > QP Physiology > QP0501 Animal biochemistry
Q Science > QR Microbiology > QR0355 Virology
Depositing User: Michael Wallis
Date Deposited: 25 Mar 2021 10:27
Last Modified: 25 Mar 2021 11:45
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/98025

View download statistics for this item

📧 Request an update