‘When we were children we had dreams, then we came to Dhaka to survive’: urban stories connecting loss of wellbeing, displacement and (im)mobility

Ayeb-Karlsson, Sonja (2020) ‘When we were children we had dreams, then we came to Dhaka to survive’: urban stories connecting loss of wellbeing, displacement and (im)mobility. Climate and Development. pp. 1-12. ISSN 1756-5529

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Abstract

This article uses storytelling methodology to investigate the connections between urban climate-induced loss of wellbeing and (im)mobility in Bhola Slum, an informal settlement in Dhaka, Bangladesh. The settlement houses Internally Displaced People from the southern coast who built and named the slum after their home - Bhola Island. The storytelling sessions revealed that loss of belonging, identity, quality of life and social value produced in people a desire to return. Nostalgic storylines of home also shaped the narratives of the children born in the slum who often referred to the island as their home. Some women felt that the move had resulted in more liberty, but also claimed that it had increased the risk of social punishment and stigmatisation. Social stigma often extended from parents to children. More women than men reported feeling unsafe, depressed and anxious. Mental and physical ill health were both common consequences of the compromised living and working conditions of the slum. Loss of health (due to injuries or disease) damaged people's wellbeing and pushed already fragile families into a downward spiral with no escape. Few empirical studies investigate ‘trapped’ populations and non-economic losses and damages in urban environments. The insights gained from this work can therefore help safeguard vulnerable populations worldwide and build more robust climate policy frameworks.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: climate change, diaspora, displacement, gender, human mobility, immobility, mental health, Non-Economic Loss and Damage, slum wellbeing, Trapped Populations
Schools and Departments: Brighton and Sussex Medical School > Brighton and Sussex Medical School
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HB Economic theory. Demography > HB0071 Economics as a science. Relation to other subjects > HB0074.A-Z Relation to other special topics, A-Z > HB0074.P8 Psychology
H Social Sciences > HB Economic theory. Demography > HB0848 Demography. Population. Vital events > HB1951 Population geography. Migration
H Social Sciences > HB Economic theory. Demography > HB0848 Demography. Population. Vital events > HB1951 Population geography. Migration > HB1955 Rural-urban migration
H Social Sciences > HC Economic history and conditions > HC0079 Special topics, A-Z > HC0079.P6 Poor. Poverty
H Social Sciences > HQ The Family. Marriage. Women > HQ0012 Sexual life > HQ0018.55 Gender identity
P Language and Literature > P Philology. Linguistics > P0040 Relation to sociology. Sociolinguistics > P0040.5.A-Z Special aspects, A-Z > P0040.5.I54 Identity (Psychology)
Q Science > QC Physics > QC0851 Meteorology. Climatology Including the earth's atmosphere > QC0980 Climatology and weather > QC0981.8.A-Z Special topics, A-Z > QC0981.8.C5 Climate change
Depositing User: Sonja Ayeb-Karlsson
Date Deposited: 01 Jul 2020 06:49
Last Modified: 03 Sep 2020 14:30
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/92208

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