"Forests are our lives, our survival, our dignity": can REDD+ effectively incorporate the rights of indigenous peoples?

Laing, Anna (2016) "Forests are our lives, our survival, our dignity": can REDD+ effectively incorporate the rights of indigenous peoples? Global Policy Journal.

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Abstract

Earlier this week, around 500 policy makers and stakeholders met to discuss the sustainable management of forests in developing countries at the Oslo REDD (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation) Exchange. Amongst these stakeholders were representatives of indigenous communities from Indonesia, Peru, Guyana, Brazil and West Africa. Their participation in REDD+ is crucial since indigenous groups typically inhabit forested areas and rely on the forests to sustain their livelihoods. Indigenous territories contain roughly 80% of the world’s remaining biodiversity, despite the fact that these communities make up just 6% of the global population. Their effective contribution to REDD+ is thus key to the successful reduction of carbon emissions from deforestation and to the broader environmental goals of limiting global warming to below 2°C. Panel sessions and debates at the conference have identified crucial gaps in the existing REDD+ architecture, however. In particular, indigenous peoples’ rights are yet to be fully recognised.

Item Type: Other
Schools and Departments: School of Global Studies > Geography
SWORD Depositor: Mx Elements Account
Depositing User: Mx Elements Account
Date Deposited: 16 Jun 2021 08:13
Last Modified: 16 Jun 2021 08:13
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/99821

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