Fovea-like photoreceptor specializations underlie single UV cone driven prey-capture behavior in zebrafish

Yoshimatsu, Takeshi, Schröder, Cornelius, Nevala, Noora E, Berens, Philipp and Baden, Tom (2020) Fovea-like photoreceptor specializations underlie single UV cone driven prey-capture behavior in zebrafish. Neuron, 107 (2). pp. 320-337. ISSN 0896-6273

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Abstract

In the eye, the function of same-type photoreceptors must be regionally adjusted to process a highly asymmetrical natural visual world. Here, we show that UV cones in the larval zebrafish area temporalis are specifically tuned for UV-bright prey capture in their upper frontal visual field, which may use the signal from a single cone at a time. For this, UV-photon detection probability is regionally boosted more than 10-fold. Next, in vivo two-photon imaging, transcriptomics, and computational modeling reveal that these cones use an elevated baseline of synaptic calcium to facilitate the encoding of bright objects, which in turn results from expressional tuning of phototransduction genes. Moreover, the light-driven synaptic calcium signal is regionally slowed by interactions with horizontal cells and later accentuated at the level of glutamate release driving retinal networks. These regional differences tally with variations between peripheral and foveal cones in primates and hint at a common mechanistic origin.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: UV vision, cone, fovea, photoreceptor, phototransduction, prey capture, retina, ribbon synapse, zebrafish
Schools and Departments: School of Life Sciences > Neuroscience
SWORD Depositor: Mx Elements Account
Depositing User: Mx Elements Account
Date Deposited: 30 Jul 2020 07:05
Last Modified: 30 Jul 2020 07:15
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/92843

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