Proxemics of screen mediation: engagement with reading on screen manifests as diminished variation due to self-control, rather than diminished mean distance from screen

Witchel, Harry J, Santos, Carlos P, Ackah, James K, Chockalingam, Nachiappan and Westling, Carina E I (2020) Proxemics of screen mediation: engagement with reading on screen manifests as diminished variation due to self-control, rather than diminished mean distance from screen. Electronic Journal of Communication, 29 (3 & 4). ISSN 1183-5656

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Abstract

Objective: Burgoon's theory of conversational involvement suggest that when people engage with a person, they will move slightly closer to them, often subtly and subconsciously. However, some studies have failed to extend this to human-computer interaction. Our hypothesis is that during online reading, engagement is associated with an expenditure of effort to hold the head upright, still and centrally.

Method: We presented to 27 participants (ages 21.00 ± 2.89, 15 female) seated in front of 47.5x27 cm monitor two reading stimuli in a counterbalanced order, one (interesting) based on a best selling novel and the other (boring) based on European Union banking regulations. The participants were video-recorded during their reading while they wore reflective motion tracking markers. The markers were video-tracked off-line using Kinovea 0.8.

Results: Subjective VAS ratings showed that the stimuli elicited the bored and interested states as expected. Video tracking showed that the boring stimulus (compared to the interesting reading) elicited a greater head-to-screen velocity, a greater head-to-screen distance range, a greater head-to-screen distance standard deviation, but not a further away head-to-screen mean distance.

Conclusions: The more interesting reading led to efforts to control the head to a more central viewing position while suppressing head fidgeting.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: Brighton and Sussex Medical School > Neuroscience
School of Media, Film and Music > Media and Film
Depositing User: Harry Witchel
Date Deposited: 05 Feb 2020 09:27
Last Modified: 26 Mar 2020 08:30
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/89749

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