The health and economic burden of podoconiosis in Ethiopia

Deribe, Kebede, Negussu, Nebiyu, Newport, Melanie J, Davey, Gail and Turner, Hugo C (2020) The health and economic burden of podoconiosis in Ethiopia. Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. pp. 1-9. ISSN 0035-9203

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Abstract

Background: Podoconiosis is one of the leading causes of lymphoedema-related morbidity in low-income settings, but little is known about the scale of its health and economic impact. This information is required to inform control programme planning and policy. In this study, we estimated the health and economic burdens of podoconiosis in Ethiopia.

Methods: We developed a model to estimate the health burden attributed to podoconiosis in terms of the number of disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) and the economic burden. We estimated the economic burden by quantifying the treatment and morbidity management costs incurred by the healthcare system in managing clinical cases, patients’ out-of-pocket costs, and their productivity costs.

Results: In 2017, there were 1.5 million cases of podoconiosis in Ethiopia, which corresponds to 172,073 DALYs or 182 per 100,000 people. The total economic burden of podoconiosis in Ethiopia is estimated to be US$213.2 million annually and 91.1% of this resulted from productivity costs. The average economic burden per podoconiosis case was US$136.9.

Conclusions: The national cost of podoconiosis is formidable. If control measures are scaled up and the morbidity burden reduced, this will lead to Ethiopia saving millions of dollars. Our estimates provide important benchmark economic costs to programme planners, policy makers and donors for resource allocation and priority setting.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: podoconiosis; lymphoedema, economic, cost, burden
Schools and Departments: Brighton and Sussex Medical School > Global Health and Infection
Research Centres and Groups: Brighton and Sussex Centre for Global Health Research
Depositing User: Deborah Miller
Date Deposited: 20 Jan 2020 08:35
Last Modified: 24 Feb 2020 14:15
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/89372

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