Influences on functional outcome and subjective recovery in individuals with and without First Episode Psychosis: a metacognitive model

Wright, Abigail, Fowler, David and Greenwood, Kathryn (2019) Influences on functional outcome and subjective recovery in individuals with and without First Episode Psychosis: a metacognitive model. Psychiatry Research. a112643. ISSN 0165-1781

[img] PDF - Accepted Version
Restricted to SRO admin only
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial No Derivatives.

Download (1MB)

Abstract

Models of functional and subjective recovery in psychosis suggest that the path between neurocognition and functioning is mediated by cognitive processes, which may include metacognition, considered ‘thinking about thinking’. Metacognition has several components: metacognitive ability, experience and efficiency, connected by metacognitive monitoring and metacognitive control processes; akin to executive control processes. This study aimed to explore whether metacognitive components are fragmented, how individuals with FEP perform on the metacognitive scores compared to healthy control participants, and whether metacognitive components are associated with functioning and, for FEP only, subjective recovery. 62 individuals with FEP and 73 matched healthy controls completed measures of metacognition, functional capacity, functional outcome, and subjective recovery; covariates: IQ and symptoms. Factor analysis, to assess loading of metacognitive items onto separate factors, demonstrated that metacognitive ability, experience, efficiency and monitoring were separate components, with limited association. Metacognitive ability and metacognitive control process were reduced in FEP sample, but metacognitive experience and monitoring process were higher in FEP. Metacognitive ability predicted functional capacity, functional outcome and subjective recovery. Metacognitive experience predicted functional capacity. This is the first study to assess key metacognitive components within a large model and consider the distinct associations with both functional and subjective recovery.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Psychology > Psychology
Depositing User: Sanjeedah Choudhury
Date Deposited: 29 Oct 2019 10:31
Last Modified: 27 Nov 2019 10:45
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/87617

View download statistics for this item

📧 Request an update