Impact of mutation rate and selection at linked sites on DNA variation across the genomes of humans and other homininae

Castellano, David, Eyre-Walker, Adam and Munch, Kasper (2019) Impact of mutation rate and selection at linked sites on DNA variation across the genomes of humans and other homininae. Genome Biology and Evolution. ISSN 1759-6653

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Abstract

DNA diversity varies across the genome of many species. Variation in diversity across a genome might arise from regional variation in the mutation rate, variation in the intensity and mode of natural selection, and regional variation in the recombination rate. We show that both non-coding and non-synonymous diversity are positively correlated to a measure of the mutation rate and the recombination rate and negatively correlated to the density of conserved sequences in 50KB windows across the genomes of humans and non-human homininae. Interestingly, we find that while non-coding diversity is equally affected by these three genomic variables, non-synonymous diversity is mostly dominated by the density of conserved sequences. The positive correlation between diversity and our measure of the mutation rate seems to be largely a direct consequence of regions with higher mutation rates having more diversity. However, the positive correlation with recombination rate and the negative correlation with the density of conserved sequences suggests that selection at linked sites also affect levels of diversity. This is supported by the observation that the ratio of the number of non-synonymous to non-coding polymorphisms is negatively correlated to a measure of the effective population size across the genome. We show these patterns persist even when we restrict our analysis to GC-conservative mutations, demonstrating that the patterns are not driven by GC biased gene conversion. In conclusion, our comparative analyses describe how recombination rate, gene density, and mutation rate interact to produce the patterns of DNA diversity that we observe along the hominine genomes.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Life Sciences > Evolution, Behaviour and Environment
Subjects: Q Science > QH Natural history > QH0301 Biology > QH0426 Genetics
Depositing User: Adam Eyre-Walker
Date Deposited: 11 Oct 2019 11:39
Last Modified: 11 Oct 2019 13:15
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/87050

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