Longitudinal associations of cultural distance with psychological well-being among Australian immigrants from 49 countries

Kashima, Emiko S and Abu-Rayya, Hisham M (2014) Longitudinal associations of cultural distance with psychological well-being among Australian immigrants from 49 countries. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 45 (4). pp. 587-600. ISSN 0022-0221

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Abstract

Data of 5,033 immigrants from 49 countries/regions to Australia, derived from Longitudinal Survey of Immigrants to Australia (LSIA), were analyzed to test a widely held assumption that greater cultural distance (CD) between immigrants’ culture of origin and their destination culture is associated with more adjustment difficulties and thus lower psychological well-being (the CD Hypothesis). Objective measures of CD were constructed from Hofstede’s four value dimensions, Schwartz’s seven dimensions, and Smith et al.’s two dimensions. The hypothesis was tested using multilevel hierarchical regression analyses which controlled for individual-level variations in age, gender, marital status, English language skills, and income. Results revealed limited support for the hypothesis. Whereas the global index of CD based on Smith et al.’s values provided support for the hypothesis, the specific indices of CD, comprised of separate value dimensions, showed a mixed pattern of relationships. Finally, most of the observed CD-well-being links were limited to the earlier phases of settlement and were diminished within 3.5 years after arrival.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: acculturation, cultural distance, cultural values, well-being, immigrants, adjustment
Schools and Departments: School of Psychology > Psychology
Depositing User: Sanjeedah Choudhury
Date Deposited: 10 Oct 2019 12:27
Last Modified: 10 Mar 2021 12:15
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/86873

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