Improved central nervous system symptoms in people with HIV without objective neuropsychiatric complaints switching from Efavirenz to Rilpivirine containing cART

Vera Rojas, Jaime H, Bracchi, Margherita, Alagaratnam, Jasmini, Lwanga, Julianne, Fox, Julie, Winston, Alan, Boffito, Marta and Nelson, Mark (2019) Improved central nervous system symptoms in people with HIV without objective neuropsychiatric complaints switching from Efavirenz to Rilpivirine containing cART. Brain Sciences, 9 (8). a195. ISSN 2076-3425

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Abstract

Objective: Occult central nervous system (CNS) symptoms not recognized by people living with HIV (PLWH) receiving efavirenz or their clinicians could occur and impact people’s quality of life. The aim of this study was to determine whether CNS parameters improve in PLWH when switching from efavirenz to rilpivirine. Methods: PLWH receiving tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, emtricitabine, efavirenz (Atripla™) with undetectable HIV RNA, and no CNS symptoms were switched cART to tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, emtricitabine, rilpivirine (Eviplera™). CNS parameters including sleep, anxiety, and depressive symptoms were evaluated using patient-reported outcome measures at baseline, 4, 12, and 24 weeks after switching therapy. A median CNS score was derived from the sum of CNS toxicities of all the grades collected in the study questionnaires. Cognitive function was assessed using a computerized test battery. Results: Of 41 participants, median age was 47 years, Interquartile range (IQR) 31, 92% were male and 80% were of white ethnicity. A significant reduction in total CNS score (10 to 7) was observed at 4 weeks (p = 0.028), but not thereafter. Significant improvements in sleep and anxiety were observed 4, 12 and 24 weeks after switching therapy (p < 0.05). No significant change in global cognitive scores was observed. Conclusions: Switching from efavirenz to rilpivirine based regimens in virologically suppressed PLWH without perceived CNS symptoms was well tolerated and slightly improved overall CNS symptoms.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: Brighton and Sussex Medical School > Global Health and Infection
Research Centres and Groups: Brighton and Sussex Centre for Global Health Research
Subjects: R Medicine
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC0109 Infectious and parasitic diseases
Depositing User: Jaime Vera Rojas
Date Deposited: 27 Aug 2019 16:04
Last Modified: 27 Aug 2019 16:15
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/85684

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