Outcome of a psychosocial health promotion intervention aimed at improving physical health and reducing alcohol use in patients with schizophrenia and psychotic disorders (MINT)

Westman, Jeanette, Eberhard, Jonas, Gaughran, Fiona P, Lundin, Lennart, Stenmark, Richard, Edman, Gunnar, Eriksson, Sven V, Jedenius, Erik, Rydell, Pia, Overgaard, Karin, Abrams, Daniel, Greenwood, Kathryn E, Smith, Shubulade, Ismail, Khalida, Murray, Robin and Ösby, Urban (2019) Outcome of a psychosocial health promotion intervention aimed at improving physical health and reducing alcohol use in patients with schizophrenia and psychotic disorders (MINT). Schizophrenia Research, 208. pp. 138-144. ISSN 09209964

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Abstract

Background: Life expectancy is reduced by 19 years in men and 17 in women with psychosis in Sweden, largely due to cardiovascular disease.

Aim: Assess whether a psychosocial health promotion intervention improves cardiometabolic risk factors, quality of life, and severity of illness in patients with psychotic disorders more than treatment as usual.
Methods: A pragmatic intervention trial testing a manual-based multi-component health promotion intervention targeting patients with psychosis. The Swedish intervention was adapted from IMPaCT therapy, a health-promotion program based on motivational interviewing and cognitive behavioral therapy, designed to be incorporated into routine care. The intervention group consisted of 119 patients and a control group of 570 patients from specialized psychosis departments. Outcome variables were assessed 6 months before intervention during the run-in period, again at the start of intervention, and 12 months after the intervention began. The control group received treatment as usual.

Results: The intervention had no significant effect on any of the outcome variables. However, BMI, waist circumference, systolic BP, heart rate, HbA1c, general health, and Clinical Global Impressions Scale score improved significantly during the run-in period before the start of the active intervention (observer effect). The multi-component design meant that treatment effects could only be calculated for the intervention as a whole.

Conclusion: The results of the intervention are similar to those of the U.K. IMPaCT study, in which the modular health-promotion intervention had little effect on cardiovascular risk indicators. However, in the current study, the run-in period had a positive effect on cardiometabolic risk factors.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Cardiovascular risk factors; lifestyle intervention; psychiatric care; mental health; psychosis; run-in period
Schools and Departments: School of Psychology > Psychology
Subjects: R Medicine
Depositing User: Sanjeedah Choudhury
Date Deposited: 17 Apr 2019 14:16
Last Modified: 01 Jul 2019 12:01
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/83315

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