Self-defining memories predict engagement in structured activity in First Episode Psychosis, independent of neurocognition and metacognition

Wright, Abigail C, Davies, Geoff, Fowler, David and Greenwood, Kathryn E (2018) Self-defining memories predict engagement in structured activity in First Episode Psychosis, independent of neurocognition and metacognition. Schizophrenia Bulletin. ISSN 0586-7614

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Abstract

Background: Self-defining memories (SDM) are vivid personal memories, related to narrative identity. Individuals with schizophrenia report less specific, more negative, and extract less meaning from these memories compared to control groups. Self-defining memories have been shown to be predicted by neurocognition, associated with metacognition, and linked to goal outcomes in healthy controls. As neurocognition and metacognition are known predictors of poor functioning in psychosis, self-defining memories may also be a predictor. No study has assessed the relationship to functioning or pattern of SDMs in First Episode Psychosis.

Methods: This was a cross-sectional study involving 71 individuals with First Episode Psychosis (FEP) and 57 healthy controls who completed a self-defining memories questionnaire. FEP participants completed measures of neurocognition, metacognition (Metacognitive Assessment Interview), functional capacity (The UCSD Performance-Based Skills Assessment) and functional outcome (Time-Use Survey).

Results: Self-defining memories reported by individuals with FEP were less integrated compared to healthy controls. Within the FEP sample, holding less specific memories was associated with engagement in significantly fewer hours of structured activity per week and specificity of SDMs mediated the relationship between neurocognition and functional outcome, independent of metacognition.

Conclusion: This is the first study to assess SDMs in FEP and to explore the important role of SDMs on clinical outcomes, compared to healthy controls. This study suggests that elaborating on specific self-defining memories is a valid therapeutic target and may be considered a tool to improve daily functioning in FEP.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: First episode psychosis; memories; functioning; metacognition
Schools and Departments: Brighton and Sussex Medical School > Brighton and Sussex Medical School
School of Psychology > Psychology
Depositing User: Sanjeedah Choudhury
Date Deposited: 15 Oct 2018 09:24
Last Modified: 02 Nov 2019 02:00
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/79484

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