From street hawkers to public markets: modernity and sanitization made in Hong Kong

Marinelli, Maurizio (2018) From street hawkers to public markets: modernity and sanitization made in Hong Kong. In: Cities in Asia by and for the people. Asian Cities . Amsterdam University Press, Amsterdam, pp. 229-257. ISBN 9789462985223

[img] PDF - Published Version
Restricted to SRO admin only

Download (524kB)

Abstract

Historically, street hawkers and street markets originated, all over the world, as the real first form of retailing. Today we still use the term ‘street markets’ to refer to outdoor spaces that are made up of a set of implicit and explicit traditions and cultural practices, but these are also spaces of sociality and connection (Watson 2009; Watson and Studdert 2006). Although street markets are primarily studied as sites for the exchange of economic goods and tradable products, they play a crucial role in the policies of urban regeneration, tangible and intangible heritage, placemaking, healthy eating, social sustainability, environmental impact, social and community cohesion, and economic innovation (Shepherd 2009; Stillerman 2006; Watson and Wells 2005). Based on the premise that street hawking and street markets are part of a wider socioeconomic and political system, this essay concentrates on the transition from street hawkers to public markets in Hong Kong, and analyses this historical transformation and their consequences within the framework of Hong Kong Government’s strategy to create a modern and sanitized city.

Item Type: Book Section
Keywords: Asia, Urban, Hong Kong
Schools and Departments: School of History, Art History and Philosophy > History
Research Centres and Groups: Sussex Asia
Subjects: D History General and Old World > DS History of Asia
D History General and Old World > DS History of Asia > DS701 China
G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation
J Political Science
Depositing User: Maurizio Marinelli
Date Deposited: 03 Aug 2018 08:57
Last Modified: 29 Mar 2019 16:18
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/77488

View download statistics for this item

📧 Request an update