The clinico-pathologic role of microRNAs miR-9 and miR-151-5p in breast cancer metastasis

Krell, Jonathan, Frampton, Adam E, Jacob, Jimmy, Pellegrino, Loredana, Roca-Alonso, Laura, Zeloof, Daniel, Alifrangis, Costi, Lewis, Jacqueline S, Jiao, Long R, Stebbing, Justin and Castellano, Leandro (2012) The clinico-pathologic role of microRNAs miR-9 and miR-151-5p in breast cancer metastasis. Molecular Diagnosis & Therapy, 16 (3). pp. 167-172. ISSN 1179-2000

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Abstract

BACKGROUND

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) may function as suppressors or promoters of tumor metastasis according to their messenger RNA targets. Previous studies have suggested that miR-9 and miR-151-5p are associated with metastasis in breast cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma, respectively. We aimed to further establish the potential roles of miR-9 and miR-151-5p in tumor invasion and metastasis and investigate their use as biomarkers.

METHODS

We used quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) to measure differences in miR-9 and miR-151-5p expression between primary breast tumors and their lymph-node metastases in 194 paired tumor samples from 97 patients. We also correlated expression levels with histologic data to investigate their utility as biomarkers.

RESULTS

There were no significant differences in miR-9 expression between the primary tumors and lymph nodes; however, miR-151-5p expression was significantly lower in the lymph-node metastases than in their corresponding tumors (p < 0.05). miR-9 levels were elevated in primary breast tumors from patients diagnosed with higher-grade tumors (p < 0.05); however, no differences were observed in miR-151-5p levels between different grades of tumor. Interestingly, miR-9 levels were elevated in invasive lobular carcinomas (ILC) compared with invasive ductal carcinomas (IDC; p < 0.01).

CONCLUSIONS

In aggregate, these data suggest that miR-151-5p upregulation may suppress metastasis in primary breast tumors. Both miRNAs may serve as useful biomarkers in future clinical trials in breast cancer.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Life Sciences > Biochemistry
Depositing User: Leandro Castellano
Date Deposited: 15 Jun 2018 12:44
Last Modified: 15 Jun 2018 12:45
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/76536
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