Increasing ethnic diversity moderates longitudinal effects of individual differences on friendship homophily

Jugert, P, Rutland, A, Brown, R, Cameron, L, Nigbur, D, Watters, C, Hossain, R, Landau, A and Le Touze, D (2017) Increasing ethnic diversity moderates longitudinal effects of individual differences on friendship homophily. Journal of Community and Applied Social Psychology, 27 (5). pp. 411-423. ISSN 1052-9284

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Abstract

This study examined direct and interactive effects of social–emotional adjustment, national and ethnic identification, and school ethnic composition on friendship homophily among 214 ethnic minority and 183 ethnic majority English children, aged between 5 and 11 years. The data came from a longitudinal study, which included 3 time points, spanning a 12‐month period. Results of multilevel latent growth curve models showed that among ethnic minority English children (teacher‐rated), peer problems and ethnic identity were associated with more friendship homophily, whereas a bicultural identity was not related to more friendship homophily. Among ethnic majority English children, the effects of peer problems and English identity were moderated by school ethnic composition, such that these factors were not associated with more friendship homophily in more ethnically diverse schools. The findings are discussed on the basis of theories of intergroup contact and intergroup threat.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Education and Social Work > Social Work and Social Care
Subjects: L Education
Depositing User: Deeptima Massey
Date Deposited: 24 Jan 2018 14:03
Last Modified: 10 Jul 2019 09:15
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/73116

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