Metacognitive beliefs mediate the relationship between anxiety sensitivity and traits of obsessive-compulsive symptoms

Gutierrez, Roberto, Hirani, Tulsi, Curtis, Leo and Ludlow, Amanda K (2020) Metacognitive beliefs mediate the relationship between anxiety sensitivity and traits of obsessive-compulsive symptoms. BMC Psychology, 8 (40). p. 40. ISSN 2050-7283

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Abstract

Background
Metacognition has been shown as a key contributor to Obsessive Compulsive Disorder as well as other anxiety-related disorders, yet its role in the development and maintenance of these disorders remains unclear. This study aims to investigate whether anxiety sensitivity traits are related to obsessive-compulsive symptoms in the general population and whether the relationship between anxiety sensitivity and obsessive-compulsive symptoms is mediated by metacognition.

Methods
Non-clinical volunteers (N = 156, mean age: 23.97, 121 females) completed measures related to state/trait anxiety, anxiety sensitivity, obsessive compulsive symptoms and metacognition.

Results
A direct relationship between anxiety sensitivity and obsessive-compulsive symptoms was established. Further analysis revealed that metacognition was the strongest mediator of this relationship, even when accounting for state and trait anxiety.

Conclusions
Results suggest that the relationships between traits of anxiety sensitivity and obsessive-compulsive symptoms are partially attributable to the role of metacognition.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Anxiety sensitivity, Metacognition, Obsessive compulsive symptoms, State anxiety, Trait anxiety, Anxiety, Anxiety Disorders, Female, Humans, Male, Metacognition, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, Surveys and Questionnaires, Young Adult
Schools and Departments: School of Psychology > Psychology
SWORD Depositor: Mx Elements Account
Depositing User: Mx Elements Account
Date Deposited: 13 Jul 2022 10:08
Last Modified: 13 Jul 2022 10:15
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/106920

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