The effects of l-carnitine supplementation on inflammatory factors, oxidative stress, and clinical outcomes in patients with sepsis admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU): study protocol for a double blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial

Keshani, Mahdi, Alikiaii, Babak, Askari, Gholamreza, Yahyapoor, Farveh, Ferns, Gordon A and Bagherniya, Mohammad (2022) The effects of l-carnitine supplementation on inflammatory factors, oxidative stress, and clinical outcomes in patients with sepsis admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU): study protocol for a double blind, randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial. Trials, 23. p. 170. ISSN 1745-6215

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Abstract

Background: Sepsis is a common cause for admission to the intensive care unit (ICU), and its incidence has been increasing. It is associated with a significant increase in serum inflammatory biomarkers such as C-reactive protein (CRP) and cytokines such as interleukin 1 (IL-1), IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF). Sepsis is also associated with pathophysiological changes that include fluid accumulation in the lungs, eventually leading to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), tissue edema, hypotension, and acute kidney injury (AKI). Conventional therapies include antibiotics, but these may have important adverse effects, so novel therapeutic approaches are required. In animal studies, l-carnitine improves antioxidant status, and in some clinical trials, it has been shown to reduce inflammation. It has also been shown to improve respiratory distress and help maintain coenzyme A homeostasis, metabolic flexibility, promoting the normal function of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and oxidation of fatty acids by peroxisomes. We aim to determine the effects of very high doses of l-carnitine on inflammatory factors, oxidative stress, and clinical outcomes of patients with sepsis in ICU. Method and design: In this double-blind, randomized controlled clinical trial, we will use block randomization of 60 patients with sepsis, aged between 20 and 65 years from Al-Zahra Hospital, Isfahan, Iran. The intervention group (n = 30) will receive three capsules of l-carnitine (each capsule contains 1000 mg l-carnitine; totally 3000 mg/day) for 7 days, and a control group (n = 30) will receive a placebo with the same dose and for the same duration in addition to usual care. At baseline, scores for clinical and nutritional status (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II), Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA), Quick SOFA (qSOFA), and NUTRIC Score) will be assessed. At beginning and end point of the study, inflammatory markers (CRP, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR)), oxidative stress status (total oxidative stress (TOS), total antioxidant capacity (TAC)), and clinical variables will be evaluated also. The mortality rate will be assessed within 28 days of the beginning of the intervention. Discussion: Because of the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties of l-carnitine, it is possible that using a high dose of 3000 mg daily of this nutritional supplement may reduce inflammation and oxidative stress and improve subsequent mortality of critically ill patients with sepsis. Trial registration: Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials IRCT20201129049534N1. Registered on 2 May 2021.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Critically ill;ICU;Inflammation;L-carnitine;Oxidative stress;Sepsis;Supplementation;Adult;Aged;Carnitine;Dietary Supplements;Humans;Intensive Care Units;Iran;Middle Aged;Oxidative Stress;Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic;Sepsis;Young Adult
Schools and Departments: Brighton and Sussex Medical School > Division of Medical Education
SWORD Depositor: Mx Elements Account
Depositing User: Mx Elements Account
Date Deposited: 01 Jul 2022 11:40
Last Modified: 01 Jul 2022 11:45
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/106737

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