A model of psychological mechanisms of inclusive music-making: empowerment of marginalised young people

Levstek, Marusa and Banerjee, Robin (2022) A model of psychological mechanisms of inclusive music-making: empowerment of marginalised young people. Music & Science, 4. pp. 1-18. ISSN 2059-2043

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Abstract

Adopting a mixed-methods research design, this study explored the psychological experiences of marginalized young people participating in inclusive music projects, with attention to inter- and intra-personal outcomes and underlying mechanisms. We worked with four different music projects, aimed at young people from lower socio-economic backgrounds or those with special educational needs and/or disabilities. With a total sample of 134 young people, parents, and creative practitioners, we used quantitative analyses of retrospective surveys to assess staff members’ perceptions of changes evident in individual young people (n1(total) = 99, n1(female) = 39, n1(male) = 59, n1(non-binary) = 1, mean age = 15.59). We performed thematic analysis on eleven semi-structured focus group discussions conducted with the young people (n2  =  26), their parents (n3  =  14), and staff members (n3  =  21), and 82 session reports completed by the staff members after each session. Growth over time in both intra-personal and inter-personal dimensions of functioning was observed, with qualitative data illuminating possible environmental and psychological mechanisms via two overarching themes of “Self-Development” and “Social Acknowledgement”. These results are collated in the model of youth empowerment, and its relevance to marginalized groups of young people is highlighted through promotion of active agency and empowerment. The model is interpreted in the light of several psychological theories of well-being, particularly self-determination theory and access-awareness-agency model, and implications for future work are discussed.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Psychology > Psychology
SWORD Depositor: Mx Elements Account
Depositing User: Mx Elements Account
Date Deposited: 09 Nov 2021 08:02
Last Modified: 06 Jan 2022 12:15
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/102755

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