Circuit-mechanisms for colour vision in zebrafish

Baden, Tom (2021) Circuit-mechanisms for colour vision in zebrafish. Current Biology, 31 (12). R807-R820. ISSN 0960-9822

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Abstract

The use of spectral information in natural light to inform behaviour is one of the oldest and most fundamental abilities of visual systems. It long-predates animals’ venture onto the land, and even the appearance of image-forming eyes. Accordingly, circuits for colour vision evolved under the surface of ancient oceans for hundreds of millions of years. These aquatic beginnings fundamentally underpin, and likely constrain, the organisation of modern visual systems. In contrast to our detailed circuit level understanding from diverse terrestrial vertebrates, however, comparatively little is known about their aquatic counterparts. Here, I summarise some of what is known about neural circuits for colour vision in fish, the most species-diverse group of vertebrates. With a focus on zebrafish, I will explore how their computational strategies are linked to the statistics of natural light in the underwater world, and how their study might help us understand vision in general, including in our own eyes.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Life Sciences > Neuroscience
SWORD Depositor: Mx Elements Account
Depositing User: Mx Elements Account
Date Deposited: 29 Jun 2021 08:02
Last Modified: 28 Feb 2022 16:58
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/100050

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Project NameSussex Project NumberFunderFunder Ref
Anisotropic retinal circuits for processing of colour and space in natureG2397BBSRC-BIOTECHNOLOGY & BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES RESEARCH COUNCILBB/R014817/1
Anisotropic retinal circuits for processing of colour and space in nature - Lister Institute Research PrizeG2503LISTER INSTITUTEUnset
EMBO Young Investigator ProgrammeG2920EMBO-EUROPEAN MOLECULAR BIOLOGY ORGANIZATIONBaden
How to connect an eye to a brainG3137WELLCOME TRUSTWT Ref: 220277/
NeuroVisEco - Zebrafish vision in its natural context: from natural scenes through retinal and central processing to behaviourG1871EUROPEAN UNION677687
Philip Leverhulme Prize - Biological SciencesG2276LEVERHULME TRUSTPLP-2017-005