Recovery self-efficacy and intention as predictors of running or jogging behavior: A cross-lagged panel analysis over a two-year period

Luszczynska, Aleksandra, Mazurkiewicz, Magda, Ziegelmann, Jochen P. and Schwarzer, Ralf (2007) Recovery self-efficacy and intention as predictors of running or jogging behavior: A cross-lagged panel analysis over a two-year period. Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 8 (2). pp. 247-260. ISSN 1469-0292

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Abstract

Objectives: The study investigates whether two kinds of self-efficacy and intention predict regular running or jogging behavior over 2 yr. Maintenance self-efficacy refers to beliefs about one's ability to maintain a behavior, whereas recovery self-efficacy pertains to beliefs about one's ability to resume a behavior after a setback. Design and methods: Longitudinal data from runners (N=139, 80% men) were collected twice with a time gap of 2 yr. Results: Cross-lagged panel analysis revealed that recovery self-efficacy and intention jointly predicted running/jogging behavior 2 yr later, whereas running/jogging behavior did not predict recovery self-efficacy and intention. No effects of maintenance self-efficacy were found. The majority of participants (n=120) experienced at least one 2-week period of decline in running or jogging behavior. Among those who experienced lapses, recovery self-efficacy remained the only significant social-cognitive predictor of behavior. Conclusions: Recovery self-efficacy is a crucial predictor of regular running or jogging behavior over 2 yr.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Psychology > Psychology
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC0581 Specialties of internal medicine > RC1200 Sports medicine
B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Depositing User: SRO Admin
Date Deposited: 09 Feb 2007
Last Modified: 06 Mar 2017 16:40
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/748
Google Scholar:27 Citations

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