It pays to be Herr Kaiser: Germans with noble-sounding surnames more often work as managers than as employees

Silberzahn, Raphael and Uhlmann, Eric Luis (2013) It pays to be Herr Kaiser: Germans with noble-sounding surnames more often work as managers than as employees. Psychological Science, 24 (12). pp. 2437-2444. ISSN 0956-7976

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Abstract

In the field study reported here (N = 222,924), we found that Germans with noble-sounding surnames, such as Kaiser ("emperor"), König ("king"), and Fürst ("prince"), more frequently hold managerial positions than Germans with last names that either refer to common everyday occupations, such as Koch ("cook"), Bauer ("farmer"), and Becker/Bäcker ("baker"), or do not refer to any social role. This phenomenon occurs despite the fact that noble-sounding surnames never indicated that the person actually held a noble title. Because of basic properties of associative cognition, the status linked to a name may spill over to its bearer and influence his or her occupational outcomes.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Read commentary on paper here http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/73372/
Keywords: associative processes, organizations, social cognition
Schools and Departments: School of Business, Management and Economics > Business and Management
Depositing User: Raphael Silberzahn
Date Deposited: 06 Feb 2018 16:47
Last Modified: 07 Feb 2018 12:31
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/73374

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