Blending online techniques with traditional face to face teaching methods to deliver final year undergraduate radiology learning content

Howlett, David, Vincent, Tim, Watson, Gillian, Owens, Emma, Webb, Richard, Gainsborough, Nicola, Fairclough, Jil, Taylor, Nick, Miles, Kenneth A, Cohen, Jonathan and Vincent, Richard (2011) Blending online techniques with traditional face to face teaching methods to deliver final year undergraduate radiology learning content. European Journal of Radiology, 78 (3). pp. 334-341. ISSN 0720-048X

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Abstract

Aim: To review the initial experience of blending a variety of online educational techniques with traditional face to face or contact-based teaching methods to deliver final year undergraduate radiology content at a UK Medical School.

Materials and methods: The Brighton and Sussex Medical School opened in 2003 and offers a 5-year undergraduate programme, with the final 5 spent in several regional centres. Year 5 involves several core clinical specialities with onsite radiology teaching provided at regional centres in the form of small-group tutorials, imaging seminars and also a one-day course. An online educational module was introduced in 2007 to facilitate equitable delivery of the year 5 curriculum between the regional centres and to support students on placement. This module had a strong radiological emphasis, with a combination of imaging integrated into clinical cases to reflect everyday practice and also dedicated radiology cases. For the second cohort of year 5 students in 2008 two additional online media-rich initiatives were introduced, to complement the online module, comprising imaging tutorials and an online case discussion room.

Results: In the first year for the 2007/2008 cohort, 490 cases were written, edited and delivered via the Medical School managed learning environment as part of the online module. 253 cases contained a form of image media, of which 195 cases had a radiological component with a total of 325 radiology images. Important aspects of radiology practice (e. g. consent, patient safety, contrast toxicity, ionising radiation) were also covered. There were 274,000 student hits on cases the first year, with students completing a mean of 169 cases each. High levels of student satisfaction were recorded in relation to the online module and also additional online radiology teaching initiatives.

Conclusion: Online educational techniques can be effectively blended with other forms of teaching to allow successful undergraduate delivery of radiology. Efficient IT links and good image quality are essential ingredients for successful student/clinician engagement.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: Brighton and Sussex Medical School > Clinical Medicine
Brighton and Sussex Medical School > Clinical and Laboratory Investigation
School of Life Sciences > Chemistry
Subjects: R Medicine > R Medicine (General) > R895 Medical physics. Medical radiology. Nuclear medicine
Depositing User: Grecia GarciaGarcia
Date Deposited: 06 Sep 2011 09:49
Last Modified: 17 Jan 2013 16:00
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/7334
Google Scholar:7 Citations
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