Detection of fixed and variable targets in the monkey prefrontal cortex

Kusunoki, Makoto, Sigala, Natasha, Gaffan, David and Duncan, John (2009) Detection of fixed and variable targets in the monkey prefrontal cortex. Cerebral Cortex, 19 (11). pp. 2522-2534. ISSN 1047-3211

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Abstract

Behavioral significance is commonly coded by prefrontal neurons. The significance of a stimulus can be fixed through experience; in complex behavior, however, significance commonly changes with short-term context. To compare these cases, we trained monkeys in 2 versions of visual target detection. In both tasks, animals monitored a series of pictures, making a go response (saccade) at the offset of a specified target picture. In one version, based on "consistent mapping" in human visual search, target and nontarget pictures were fixed throughout training. In the other, based on "varied mapping," a cue at trial onset defined a new target. Building up over the first 1 s following this cue, many cells coded short-term context (cue/target identity) for the current trial. Thereafter, the cell population showed similar coding of behavioral significance in the 2 tasks, with selective early response to targets, and later, sustained activity coding target or nontarget until response. This population similarity was seen despite quite different activity in the 2 tasks for many single cells. At the population level, the results suggest similar prefrontal coding of fixed and short-term behavioral significance

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: Brighton and Sussex Medical School > Clinical Medicine
Subjects: R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC0321 Neurosciences. Biological psychiatry. Neuropsychiatry
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC0321 Neurosciences. Biological psychiatry. Neuropsychiatry > RC0346 Neurology. Diseases of the nervous system Including speech disorders
Depositing User: Grecia GarciaGarcia
Date Deposited: 22 Aug 2011 10:33
Last Modified: 14 Nov 2012 13:09
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/7280
Google Scholar:8 Citations
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