Sociology and postcolonialism: another “missing” revolution?

Bhambra, Gurminder K (2007) Sociology and postcolonialism: another “missing” revolution? Sociology, 41 (5). pp. 871-884. ISSN 0038-0385

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

Sociology is usually represented as having emerged alongside European modernity. The latter is frequently understood as sociology's special object with sociology itself a distinctively modern form of explanation. The period of sociology's disciplinary formation was also the heyday of European colonialism, yet the colonial relationship did not figure in the development of sociological understandings. While the recent emergence of postcolonialism appears to have initiated a reconsideration of understandings of modernity, with the development of theories of multiple modernities, I suggest that this engagement is more an attempt at recuperating the transformative aspect of postcolonialism than engaging with its critiques. In setting out the challenge of postcolonialism to dominant sociological accounts, I also address `missing feminist/queer revolutions', suggesting that by engaging with postcolonialism there is the potential to transform sociological understandings by opening up a dialogue beyond the simple pluralism of identity claims.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Global Studies > Geography
Depositing User: Sharon Krummel
Date Deposited: 16 Nov 2017 09:21
Last Modified: 16 Nov 2017 09:21
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/71296
📧 Request an update