Guided self-help cognitive-behaviour Intervention for VoicEs (GiVE): results from a pilot randomised controlled trial in a transdiagnostic sample

Hazell, Cassie, Hayward, Mark, Cavanagh, Kate, Jones, Anna-Marie and Strauss, Clara (2018) Guided self-help cognitive-behaviour Intervention for VoicEs (GiVE): results from a pilot randomised controlled trial in a transdiagnostic sample. Schizophrenia Research, 195. pp. 441-447. ISSN 0920-9964

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Abstract

Background: Few patients have access to cognitive behaviour therapy for psychosis (CBTp) even though at least
16 sessions of CBTp is recommended in treatment guidelines. Briefer CBTp could improve access as the same
number of therapists could see more patients. In addition, focusing on single psychotic symptoms, such as
auditory hallucinations (‘voices’), rather than on psychosis more broadly, may yield greater benefits.
Method: This pilot RCT recruited 28 participants (with a range of diagnoses) from NHS mental health services
who were distressed by hearing voices. The study compared an 8-session guided self-help CBT intervention for
distressing voiceswith a wait-list control. Data were collected at baseline and at 12 weekswith post-therapy assessments
conducted blind to allocation. Voice-impact was the pre-determined primary outcome. Secondary
outcomes were depression, anxiety, wellbeing and recovery. Mechanism measures were self-esteem, beliefs
about self, beliefs about voices and voice-relating.
Results: Recruitment and retention was feasible with low study (3.6%) and therapy (14.3%) dropout. There were
large, statistically significant between-group effects on the primary outcome of voice-impact (d=1.78; 95% CIs:
0.86–2.70), which exceeded the minimum clinically important difference. Large, statistically significant effects
were found on a number of secondary and mechanism measures.
Conclusions: Large effects on the pre-determined primary outcome of voice-impact are encouraging, and criteria
for progressing to a definitive trial are met. Significant between-group effects on measures of self-esteem, negative
beliefs about self and beliefs about voiceomnipotence are consistentwith these beingmechanisms of change
and this requires testing in a future trial.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: CBT Psychosis Distressing voices Auditory hallucinations RCT Self-help
Schools and Departments: School of Psychology > Psychology
Depositing User: Ellena Adams
Date Deposited: 16 Oct 2017 13:15
Last Modified: 30 Jun 2018 12:11
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/70540

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