Using narrative evidence synthesis in HRM research: an overview of the method, its application and the lessons learned

Madden, Adrian, Bailey, Katie, Alfes, Kerstin and Fletcher, Luke (2017) Using narrative evidence synthesis in HRM research: an overview of the method, its application and the lessons learned. Human Resource Management. ISSN 0090-4848 (Accepted)

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Abstract

The use of systematic approaches to evidence review and synthesis has recently become more common in the field of organizational research, yet their value remains unclear and largely untested. First used in medical research, evidence review is a technique for identifying, evaluating and synthesizing existing empirical evidence. With greater demand for the best evidence about ‘what works’ in organizational settings, nuanced approaches to evidence synthesis have evolved to address more complex research questions. Narrative synthesis is perceived to be particularly suited to evaluating diverse evidence types spanning multiple disciplinary fields, characteristic of the HRM domain. This article evaluates the narrative evidence synthesis approach, explains how it differs from other techniques and describes a worked example in relation to employee engagement. We consider its strengths, the challenges of using it and its value in HRM research.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Business, Management and Economics > Business and Management
Research Centres and Groups: Future of Work Hub
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HF Commerce > HF5001 Business > HF5549 Personnel management. Employment management
Depositing User: Katie Bailey
Date Deposited: 02 Aug 2017 08:10
Last Modified: 16 Aug 2017 00:36
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/69523

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Project NameSussex Project NumberFunderFunder Ref
Enhancing and embedding staff engagement in the NHS - putting theory into practiceG1271NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR HEALTH RESEARCHNIHR 12/5004/01