Moderating effects of pro-environmental self-identity on pro-environmental intentions and behaviour: a multi-behaviour study

Carfora, V, Caso, D, Sparks, P and Conner, M (2017) Moderating effects of pro-environmental self-identity on pro-environmental intentions and behaviour: a multi-behaviour study. Journal of Environmental Psychology, 53. pp. 92-99. ISSN 0272-4944

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Abstract

Self-identity is considered as a useful additional predictor in the theory of planned behaviour (TPB). However, previous research generally assessed the impact of pro-environmental self-identity in relation to single behaviours and no studies considered its potential role in moderating the impact of other predictors on behaviour. The present research used a within-persons approach to examine effects across behaviours and a longitudinal design to assess the moderating role of self-identity in the prediction of intentions and behaviours, controlling for past behaviour. Participants (N = 240) completed Time 1 questionnaires measuring TPB constructs in relation to five different pro-environmental behaviours. Two weeks later, participants (N = 220) responded to a questionnaire assessing self-reports of these behaviours during the intervening two-week period. Across pro-environmental behaviours the findings showed that pro-environmental self-identity significantly moderated the impact of perceived behavioural control on intentions and the effect of past behaviour on both intentions and behaviours.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Psychology > Psychology
Research Centres and Groups: Social and Applied Psychology Research Group
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion
B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology > BF0501 Motivation
Depositing User: Paul Sparks
Date Deposited: 04 Jul 2017 13:47
Last Modified: 19 Jul 2017 21:39
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/69041

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