Understanding Arabic language teachers' beliefs about ICT: a case study

Attia, Mariam (2009) Understanding Arabic language teachers' beliefs about ICT: a case study. In: EUROCALL 2009, 9 - 12 September 2009, Universidad Politécnica de Valencia, Gandia, Spain.

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Abstract

This poster highlights the emerging findings of an ongoing research project which aims to explore Arabic language teachers’ beliefs and attitudes towards using technology in their teaching. Due to the situated nature of the project, I chose to implement a multiple case study design, whereupon three in-service teachers were selected to represent different perspectives on integrating technology into teaching Arabic as foreign language. The poster presents the profile of one of the teachers based on a comprehensive within-case analysis of her data, and guided by former research on language teacher cognition (e.g. Borg 2006; Lam, 2000; Woods, 1996). As an early adopter of ICT in her teaching, I shed light on my informant’s stated beliefs and attitudes towards technology, as well as their relationship with her actual practice. The impact of her former schooling experience and earlier professional training on her perceptions and use of ICT are also addressed. Furthermore, contextual factors are identified with specific emphasis on their role in influencing both teacher cognition and classroom practice. As implementation of technology takes place within an Arabic language teaching setting, I give particular attention to my teacher’s pedagogical theories associated with using technology in teaching the Arabic language, an area which remains under-researched and in need of further investigation.

Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Poster)
Schools and Departments: School of Education and Social Work > Education
Subjects: L Education
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Deeptima Massey
Date Deposited: 22 May 2017 09:12
Last Modified: 22 May 2017 09:12
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/68161
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