Evaluation of the surface chemistry and drug-polymer interaction of semi-crystalline micro-particles for the development of controlled release formulations

Mithu, Sadeque H, Hauqe, Syed N, Chowdhry, Babur Z, Nokhodchi, Ali and Maniruzzaman, Mohammed (2017) Evaluation of the surface chemistry and drug-polymer interaction of semi-crystalline micro-particles for the development of controlled release formulations. Materials Science and Engineering: C, 76. pp. 559-567. ISSN 0928-4931

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Abstract

This research work explores the surface chemistry and drug-polymer interaction in the manufactured controlled release micro-particles. Isoniazid (INH) was used as a model anti-tubercular drug while Eudragit® S100 (S100), Eudragit® L100-55 based co-processed Acryl EZE (EZE) and Ethylcellulose ECN10 (ECN10) were used as polymeric carriers. INH containing micro-particles were prepared using a mini spray dryer B-290 (Buchi, Switzerland). The drug polymer ratios were optimized at 1:1 and 1:3 to evaluate the effect of polymers on the release of the drug from the micro-particles. Solid state characterization via SEM and particle size analysis of the manufactured micro-particles showed densely aggregated spherical particles with a mean diameter < 10 μm. The advanced surface analysis via EDS revealed a homogenous drug distribution on the spray dried micro-particles. The physico-chemical characterization carried out by using DSC and XRPD showed an increase in the amorphicity of the drug during the spray drying process while the chemical elemental analysis via XPS revealed a strong intermolecular interaction between the amine group of the drug and the carboxyl group of the polymers. As expected, the in vitro dissolution study showed a slow release pattern for the highly water soluble drug INH in acidic media (pH 1.2) for the first 2 h followed by a burst release upon changing the pH to 6.8. It was concluded that emerging spray drying processing can be used as a valuable tool to encapsulate drug for controlled release dosage forms by means of facilitating a possible drug/polymer interaction as outlined by novel XPS analysis.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Life Sciences > Chemistry
Depositing User: Mohammed Maniruzzaman
Date Deposited: 20 Mar 2017 07:59
Last Modified: 27 May 2017 00:37
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/67130

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