Protocol: Which variables are useful for phenotyping dementia in primary care records? A meta-analysis

Ford, Elizabeth, Greenslade, Nicholas and Paudyal, Priyamvada (2017) Protocol: Which variables are useful for phenotyping dementia in primary care records? A meta-analysis. Sussex SRO.

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Abstract

Dementia is usually identified in primary care by general practitioners (GPs) and most identified patients are referred on to memory assessment clinics for formal diagnosis. However, epidemiological studies suggest only 50% of dementia cases are recorded in general practice. The UK government and the NHS have made increasing diagnosis rates a strategic priority. A range of indicators in the primary care record are likely to be predictive of patients at high risk of dementia and could be combined in a predictive model to help increase diagnosis rates. As part of the Wellcome Trust funded ASTRODEM study, we aim to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis to identify conditions and medications previously found to be associated with dementia in primary care records.

Item Type: Other
Keywords: Dementia, Primary Care, Diagnosis, General Practice, Electronic Health Records
Schools and Departments: Brighton and Sussex Medical School > Primary Care and Public Health
Brighton and Sussex Medical School > Division of Medical Education
Subjects: R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
R Medicine > R Medicine (General) > R858 Computer applications to medicine. Medical informatics
R Medicine > R Medicine (General) > R864 Medical records
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC0321 Neurosciences. Biological psychiatry. Neuropsychiatry > RC0438 Psychiatry
Depositing User: Elizabeth Ford
Date Deposited: 17 Mar 2017 08:24
Last Modified: 25 Sep 2017 10:00
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/67005

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Project NameSussex Project NumberFunderFunder Ref
Using astrophysics to close the diagnosis gap for dementia in UK general practicepFACT 6122Wellcome Trust202133/Z/16/Z