Network functional connectivity and whole-brain functional connectomics to investigate cognitive decline in neurodegenerative conditions

Dipasqualie, Ottavia and Cercignani, Mara (2016) Network functional connectivity and whole-brain functional connectomics to investigate cognitive decline in neurodegenerative conditions. Functional Neurology, 31 (4). pp. 191-203. ISSN 0393-5264

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Abstract

Non-invasive mapping of brain functional connectivity (FC) has played a fundamental role in neuroscience, and numerous scientists have been fascinated by its ability to reveal the brain's intricate morphology and functional properties. In recent years, two different techniques have been developed that are able to explore FC in pathophysiological conditions and to provide simple and non-invasive biomarkers for the detection of disease onset, severity and progression. These techniques are independent component analysis, which allows a network-based functional exploration of the brain, and graph theory, which provides a quantitative characterization of the whole-brain FC. In this paper we provide an overview of these two techniques and some examples of their clinical applications in the most common neurodegenerative disorders associated with cognitive decline, including mild cognitive impairment, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, dementia with Lewy Bodies and behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia

Item Type: Article
Keywords: brain functional connectivity, graph theoretical methods, independent component analysis, neurodegenerative disorders, resting state networks
Schools and Departments: Brighton and Sussex Medical School > Neuroscience
Subjects: R Medicine
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC0321 Neurosciences. Biological psychiatry. Neuropsychiatry > RC0346 Neurology. Diseases of the nervous system Including speech disorders
Depositing User: Patricia Butler
Date Deposited: 03 Jan 2017 10:29
Last Modified: 25 Jul 2017 12:03
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/65985

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