Working children in Europe: a socio-legal approach to the regulation of child work

Ferreira, Nuno (2017) Working children in Europe: a socio-legal approach to the regulation of child work. European Journal of Comparative Law and Governance, 4 (1). pp. 43-104. ISSN 2213-4506

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Abstract

Since the beginning of the 2008 economic crisis, reports of child work across Europe have increased. This article looks into the European Union (EU) legal framework that applies to children who work, and offers a socio-legal analysis of child work regulation more generally. In so doing, it considers the role of a range of factors relevant to the regulation of child work, including children’s rights, cultural relativism, social constructions of childhood, empirical evidence of the benefits and harm of child work, and the different contexts in which children are found working. The article advances a justification for a restrictive approach in relation to child work in the European context, on the basis of legal, social, economic and cultural factors.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: children’s rights, child labour, child work, European Union, labour law, Young Workers Directive, cultural relativism, childhood
Schools and Departments: School of Law, Politics and Sociology > Law
Subjects: K Law
K Law > K Law in General. Comparative and uniform Law. Jurisprudence > K0201 Jurisprudence. Philosophy and theory of law
K Law > K Law in General. Comparative and uniform Law. Jurisprudence > K0520 Comparative law. International uniform law
K Law > K Law in General. Comparative and uniform Law. Jurisprudence
K Law > K Law in General. Comparative and uniform Law. Jurisprudence > K0520 Comparative law. International uniform law > K3150 Public law
K Law > KJ Europe
Depositing User: Nuno Ferreira
Date Deposited: 20 Oct 2016 16:30
Last Modified: 11 Sep 2017 22:48
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/64930

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