What factors are important in smoking cessation and relapse in women from deprived communities? A qualitative study in Southeast England

Memon, A, Barber, J, Rumsby, E, Parker, S, Mohebati, L, de Visser, R O, Venables, S, Fairhurst, A, Lawson, K and Sundin, J (2016) What factors are important in smoking cessation and relapse in women from deprived communities? A qualitative study in Southeast England. Public Health, 134. pp. 39-45. ISSN 0033-3506

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Abstract

Objectives: Women are relatively more susceptible to smoking-related diseases and find it more difficult to quit; however, little research exists on factors associated with smoking cessation and relapse in women. We examined attitudes towards and perceptions of factors associated with smoking cessation and relapse in women from deprived communities.
Study design: Qualitative interview study.
Methods: Participants included eleven women, smokers and ex-smokers, from disadvantaged communities in East Sussex, England, who had used the National Health Service
(NHS) stop smoking service. Data were collected through a focus group and semi-structured interviews, and subjected to thematic analysis.
Results: Participants opined that it is more difficult for women to quit smoking than men.
Women felt that post cessation weight gain was inevitable and acted as a barrier to quitting. Hormonal fluctuations during the menstrual cycle and greater levels of stress
were perceived as obstacles to quitting and reasons for relapse. Conversely, the women cited effects of smoking on physical appearance, oral hygiene and guilt about exposing children to passive smoke as powerful motivators to quit; and highlighted the impact of public health campaigns that focused on these factors. Views diverged on whether quitting with someone close to you is a help or hindrance. Other themes including alcohol intake, daily routine and being in the presence of smokers emerged as situational triggers of relapse.
Conclusions: Interventions that address women's concerns related to post cessation weight gain, hormonal fluctuations during the menstrual cycle and stress may aid with smoking cessation and reduce relapse. Public health campaigns should consider the impact of smoking on physical appearance and the effect of passive smoke on children.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: Brighton and Sussex Medical School > Primary Care and Public Health
Subjects: R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine > RA0440 Study and teaching. Research
Depositing User: Phoenix Marshall
Date Deposited: 27 Sep 2016 09:59
Last Modified: 13 Mar 2017 11:22
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/63564

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