Mapping the altered patterns of cerebellar resting-state function in longitudinal amnestic mild cognitive impairment patients

Baia, Feng, Liaoc, Wei, Watson, David R, Shib, Yongmei, Yuanb, Yonggui, Cohene, Alexander D, Xiea, Chunming, Wanga, Yi, Yuea, Chunxian, Tenga, Yuhuan, Wua, Di and Jiaf, Jianping (2011) Mapping the altered patterns of cerebellar resting-state function in longitudinal amnestic mild cognitive impairment patients. Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, 23 (1). pp. 87-99. ISSN 1387-2877

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Abstract

The cerebellum is known to be a relatively well preserved structure, but subtle alterations may occur early in the evolution of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) patients appear to be particularly vulnerable to AD. However, little is currently known whether altered patterns of cerebellar function occur in aMCI patients. 26 aMCI patients and 18 well-matched healthy controls underwent a baseline resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scan. After a mean follow-up period of 20 months, the subjects who successfully completed baseline fMRI scans underwent a further follow-up scan, while spontaneous activation and functional connectivity of the cerebellum were explored by using resting-state fMRI. Compared to controls, increased amplitude of low frequency fluctuation of the posterior cerebellar lobe may contribute to the underlying mechanisms affected, while greater decreased functional connections to the posterior cerebellar lobe were identified in the longitudinal study of aMCI patients. This suggests that abnormal functional connectivity of the cerebellum may offer a more sensitive and possibly preferred index of functional disturbance than regional activity measures in aMCI patients. The cerebellum may be partly related to the underlying mechanisms of aMCI, and it could help guide subsequent investigations designed to specify the precise functional role of cerebellum in aMCI patients.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: Brighton and Sussex Medical School > Neuroscience
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC0321 Neurosciences. Biological psychiatry. Neuropsychiatry
Depositing User: Parisa Rafizadeh-Farahani
Date Deposited: 03 Oct 2016 13:19
Last Modified: 26 Sep 2017 12:44
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/63517

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