Perceiving time differences when you should not: applying the El Greco fallacy to hypnotic time distortions

Martin, Jean-Rémy, Sackur, Jérôme, Anlló, Hernan, Naish, Peter and Dienes, Zoltan (2016) Perceiving time differences when you should not: applying the El Greco fallacy to hypnotic time distortions. Frontiers in Psychology. ISSN 1664-1078

[img] PDF (This Document is protected by copyright and was first published by Frontiers. All rights reserved. it is reproduced with permission) - Accepted Version
Restricted to SRO admin only
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (486kB)
[img] PDF - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (606kB)

Abstract

The way we experience and estimate time – subjective time – does not systematically correspond to objective time (the physical duration of an event). Many factors can influence subjective time and lead to mental dilation or compression of objective time. The emotional valence of stimuli or the level of attention or expectancy are known to modulate subjective time although objective time is constant. Hypnosis too is known to alter people’s perception of time. However, it is not known whether hypnotic time distortions are intrinsic perceptual effects, based for example on the changing rate of an internal clock, or rather the result of a response to demand characteristics. Here we distinguished the theories using the logic of the El Greco fallacy. When participants initially had to compare the duration of two successive events —with the same duration — while in “trance”, they responded that the second event was on average longer than the first event. As both events were estimated in “trance”, if hypnosis impacted an internal clock, they should have been affected to the same extent. Conversely, when only the first event was in “trance”, there
was no difference in perceived duration. The findings conform to an El Greco fallacy effect and challenge theories of hypnotic time distortion arguing that “trance” itself changes subjective time.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: Time Perception, Time distortion, Greco fallacy, Hypnosis, Suggestion
Schools and Departments: School of Psychology > Psychology
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion
Depositing User: Alexandra Barnard
Date Deposited: 17 Aug 2016 14:39
Last Modified: 15 Aug 2017 10:57
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/62155

View download statistics for this item

📧 Request an update