'An anxious entangling and perplexing of consciences': John Donne and catholic recusant mendacity

Altman, Shanyn Leigh (2015) 'An anxious entangling and perplexing of consciences': John Donne and catholic recusant mendacity. European Journal of English Studies, 19 (2). pp. 176-188. ISSN 1382-5577

This is the latest version of this item.

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

This article explores Donne’s defence of the Jacobean Oath of Allegiance in Pseudo-Martyr, and argues that in this text mendacity is presented as a Christian virtue during a time when the religious conscience was being called into question. It contends that critics who commonly assert that Donne’s support of the State was at odds with his religious beliefs have misread the argument in Pseudo-Martyr, which demonstrates that the safest way to achieve salvation is not through the Church but through the State. It further argues that in Donne’s view the taking of an oath should benefit society rather than reflect the true interiority of the subject.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: John Donne, Casuistry, Oath of Allegiance, Conscience, Pseudo-Martyr, James I, Martyrdom, State and Church, Woman's Constancy
Schools and Departments: School of English > English
Subjects: P Language and Literature > PE English > PE0814 Early Modern English
Depositing User: Shanyn Leigh Altman
Date Deposited: 28 Jun 2016 09:09
Last Modified: 30 Sep 2016 09:51
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/61750

Available Versions of this Item

📧 Request an update