Shared neural basis of social and non-social reward deficits in chronic cocaine users

Tobler, Philippe N, Preller, Katrin H, Campbell-Meiklejohn, Daniel K, Kirschner, Matthias, Kraehenmann, Rainer, Stämpfli, Philipp, Herdener, Marcus, Seifritz, Erich and Quednow, Boris B (2016) Shared neural basis of social and non-social reward deficits in chronic cocaine users. Social cognitive and affective neuroscience, 11 (6). pp. 1017-1025. ISSN 1749-5024

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Abstract

Changed reward functions have been proposed as a core feature of stimulant addiction, typically observed as reduced neural responses to non-drug-related rewards. However, it was unclear yet how specific this deficit is for different types of non-drug rewards arising from social and non-social reinforcements. We used functional neuroimaging in cocaine users to investigate explicit social reward as modeled by agreement of music preferences with music experts. Additionally, we investigated non-social reward as modeled by winning desired music pieces. The study included 17 chronic cocaine users and 17 matched stimulant-naive healthy controls. Cocaine users, compared to controls, showed blunted neural responses to both social and non-social reward. Activation differences were located in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex overlapping for both reward types and, thus, suggesting a non-specific deficit in the processing of non-drug rewards. Interestingly, in the posterior lateral orbitofrontal cortex, social reward responses of cocaine users decreased with the degree to which they were influenced by social feedback from the experts, a response pattern that was opposite to that observed in healthy controls. The present results suggest that cocaine users likely suffer from a generalized impairment in value representation as well as from an aberrant processing of social feedback.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Psychology > Psychology
Subjects: Q Science > QP Physiology > QP0351 Neurophysiology and neuropsychology
R Medicine > RM Therapeutics. Pharmacology > RM0300 Drugs and their actions
Depositing User: Daniel Campbell-Meiklejohn
Date Deposited: 21 Mar 2016 15:13
Last Modified: 05 Oct 2016 13:39
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/60117
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