The monkey selfie: copyright lessons for originality in photographs and internet jurisdiction

Guadamuz, Andres (2016) The monkey selfie: copyright lessons for originality in photographs and internet jurisdiction. Internet Policy Review, 5 (1). ISSN 2197-6775

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Abstract

In 2011, a macaque monkey used a camera belonging to British photographer David Slater in Indonesia to take a self-portrait. The selfie picture became famous worldwide after it was published in the British media. In 2014 Slater sent a removal request to Wikimedia Commons, which indicated that the picture was in the public domain because it had been taken by the monkey and animals cannot own copyright works. While most of the legal analysis so far has been centred around US law, this article takes a completely different approach. Re-assessing jurisdictional issues, I examine the case from a UK and European perspective. The monkey selfie is of importance to internet policy: it has a lot to teach us about online jurisdiction. Under current originality rules, David Slater has a good copyright claim for ownership of the picture.

Item Type: Article
Keywords: monkey, selfie, copyright, originality, jurisdiction, case, PETA
Schools and Departments: School of Law, Politics and Sociology > Law
Subjects: K Law > K Law in General. Comparative and uniform Law. Jurisprudence
K Law > K Law in General. Comparative and uniform Law. Jurisprudence > K0520 Comparative law. International uniform law > K1401 Intellectual property
K Law > K Law in General. Comparative and uniform Law. Jurisprudence > K7000 Private international law. Conflict of laws > K7550 Intellectual property
Depositing User: Andres Guadamuz
Date Deposited: 21 Mar 2016 14:21
Last Modified: 06 Mar 2017 20:34
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/60116

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