British citizenship, gender and migration: the containment of cultural differences and the stratification of belonging

Morrice, Linda (2016) British citizenship, gender and migration: the containment of cultural differences and the stratification of belonging. British Journal of Sociology of Education, 30 (5). pp. 597-609. ISSN 0142-5692

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Abstract

Debates about integration, British values and identity, who can belong and who can become a citizen, have been fuelled by concerns about growing cultural diversity in the United Kingdom. To promote a shared sense of national identity and claim a universal and normative citizen subject, the UK government, along with many other western nations, has introduced compulsory citizenship and language testing. This article traces and critiques the evolution of the British citizenship test since its introduction in 2005
and argues that the regime fails to recognise the gendered and segmented nature of migration, and functions as a silent and largely invisible mechanism of civic stratification and control. Drawing on Home Office data, it is argued that citizenship testing enables the government to cherry pick migrants who conform to an idealised citizen subject, while containing cultural difference by excluding others, particularly women, who are tolerated but remain
symbolic non-citizens.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Education and Social Work > Education
Subjects: L Education
Depositing User: Deeptima Massey
Date Deposited: 12 Feb 2016 15:32
Last Modified: 10 Oct 2017 15:28
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/59633

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Project NameSussex Project NumberFunderFunder Ref
Cultural Values from the Subaltern Perspective: A Phenomenology of Refugees' Experience of British Cultural ValuesG1151AHRC-ARTS & HUMANITIES RESEARCH COUNCILAH/L005409/1