The bristle patterning genes hairy and extramacrochaetae regulate the development of structures required for flight in Diptera

Costa, Marta, Calleja, Manuel, Alonso, Claudio R and Simpson, Pat (2014) The bristle patterning genes hairy and extramacrochaetae regulate the development of structures required for flight in Diptera. Developmental Biology, 388 (2). pp. 205-215. ISSN 0012-1606

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Abstract

The distribution of sensory bristles on the thorax of Diptera (true flies) provides a useful model for the study of the evolution of spatial patterns. Large bristles called macrochaetes are arranged into speciesspecific stereotypical patterns determined via spatially discrete expression of the proneural genes achaete–scute (ac–sc). In Drosophila ac-sc expression is regulated by transcriptional activation at sites where bristle precursors develop and by repression outside of these sites. Three genes, extramacrochaetae (emc), hairy (h) and stripe (sr), involved in repression have been documented. Here we demonstrate that in Drosophila, the repressor genes emc and h, like sr, play an essential role in the development of structures forming part of the flight apparatus. In addition we find that, in Calliphora vicina a species diverged from D. melanogaster by about 100 Myr, spatial expression of emc, h and sr is conserved at the location of development of those structures. Based on these findings we argue, first, that the role emc, h
and sr in development of the flight apparatus preceded their activities for macrochaete patterning; second, that species-specific variation in activation and repression of ac-sc expression is evolving in
parallel to establish a unique distribution of macrochaetes in each species

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Life Sciences > Neuroscience
Subjects: Q Science > QH Natural history > QH0301 Biology > QH0426 Genetics
Depositing User: Claudio Alonso
Date Deposited: 15 Jan 2016 13:45
Last Modified: 06 Mar 2017 11:33
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/59194

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