Nuclear tau and its potential role in Alzheimer’s disease

Bukar Maina, Mahmoud, Al-Hilaly, Youssra and Serpell, Louise (2016) Nuclear tau and its potential role in Alzheimer’s disease. Biomolecules, 6 (1). p. 9. ISSN 2218-273X

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Abstract

Tau protein, found in both neuronal and non-neuronal cells, forms aggregates in neurons that constitutes one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). For nearly four decades, research efforts have focused more on tau’s role in physiology and pathology in the context of the microtubules, even though, for over three decades, tau has been localised in the nucleus and the nucleolus. Its nuclear and nucleolar localisation had stimulated many questions regarding its role in these compartments. Data from cell culture, mouse brain, and the human brain suggests that nuclear tau could be essential for genome defense against cellular distress. However, its nature of translocation to the nucleus, its nuclear conformation and interaction with the DNA and other nuclear proteins highly suggest it could play multiple roles in the nucleus. To find efficient tau-based therapies, there is a need to understand more about the functional relevance of the varied cellular distribution of tau, identify whether specific tau transcripts or isoforms could predict tau’s localisation and function and how they are altered in diseases like AD. Here, we explore the cellular distribution of tau, its nuclear localisation and function and its possible involvement in neurodegeneration.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Life Sciences > Biochemistry
Depositing User: Youssra Al-Hilaly
Date Deposited: 15 Jan 2016 10:11
Last Modified: 14 Mar 2017 10:32
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/59191

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