Fuel poverty, affordability, and energy justice in England: policy insights from the warm front program

Sovacool, Benjamin K (2015) Fuel poverty, affordability, and energy justice in England: policy insights from the warm front program. Energy, 93. pp. 361-371. ISSN 0360-5442

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Abstract

Millions of homes around the world suffer from “fuel poverty,” commonly defined as the necessity to spend more than 10 percent of their income paying energy bills. This article first discusses how home energy efficiency schemes, such as those that pay to weatherize doors and windows, install insulation, and give free energy audits, can significantly reduce the prevalence of fuel poverty. It then examines the “Warm Front” program in England, which over the course of 2000–2013 saw 2.3 million “fuel poor” British homes receive energy efficiency upgrades to save them money and improve their overall health. Warm Front not only lessened the prevalence of fuel poverty; it cut greenhouse gas emissions, produced an average extra annual income of £1894.79 per participating household, and reported exceptional customer satisfaction with more than 90 percent of its customers praising the scheme. This study details the history, benefits, and challenges of the program, and it teases out six noteworthy lessons for energy analysts, planners, and policymakers.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Business, Management and Economics > SPRU - Science Policy Research Unit
Depositing User: Benjamin Sovacool
Date Deposited: 25 Feb 2016 08:56
Last Modified: 06 Jun 2016 09:38
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/58441
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