Environmental damage, abandoned treaties, and fossil-fuel dependence: the coming costs of oil-and-gas exploration in the “1002 area” of the Arctic national wildlife refuge

Sovacool, Benjamin K (2007) Environmental damage, abandoned treaties, and fossil-fuel dependence: the coming costs of oil-and-gas exploration in the “1002 area” of the Arctic national wildlife refuge. Environment, Development and Sustainability, 9 (2). pp. 187-201. ISSN 1387-585X

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Abstract

Contrary to claims from American politicians, lobbyists, and oil and gas executives, allowing energy development in the Alaskan Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) will harm the environment, compromise international law, erode the social significance of wilderness protection, and ultimately fail to␣increase the energy security of the United States. After exploring a brief history of the ANWR controversy, this piece argues that the operation of oil and gas refineries in ANWR will release discharged solids, drilling waste, and dirty diesel fuel into the ecosystem’s food-chain, as they have from oil operations in Prudhoe Bay. Less obvious but equally important, oil and gas exploration in ANWR will violate a number of international treaties on biodiversity protection. In the end, development in ANWR will threaten the concept of wilderness protection, and will do little to end US dependence on foreign sources of energy.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Business, Management and Economics > SPRU - Science Policy Research Unit
Depositing User: Benjamin Sovacool
Date Deposited: 02 Dec 2015 13:17
Last Modified: 02 Jun 2016 08:43
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/58104
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