Street-level bureaucracy: an underused theoretical model for general practice?

Cooper, Maxwell, Sornalingam, Sangeetha and O'Donnell, Catherine (2015) Street-level bureaucracy: an underused theoretical model for general practice? British Journal of General Practice, 65 (636). pp. 376-377. ISSN 0960-1643

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Abstract

Street-level bureaucracy (SLB) is a sociological theory that seeks to explain the working practices and beliefs of frontline workers in public services and the ways in which they enact public policy in their routine work. Developed by an American, Michael Lipsky, it examines the workplace in terms of systematic and practical dilemmas that must be overcome by employees, with a particular focus on public services such as welfare, policing, and education. The theory is based on the notion that public services represent ‘the coal mines of welfare where the “hard, dirty and dangerous work” of the state’ is done.’

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: Brighton and Sussex Medical School > Brighton and Sussex Medical School
Brighton and Sussex Medical School > Primary Care and Public Health
Brighton and Sussex Medical School > Division of Medical Education
Subjects: R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
Depositing User: Jane Hale
Date Deposited: 21 Sep 2015 14:47
Last Modified: 22 Sep 2017 13:31
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/56853
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