Advances in understanding mineral dust and boundary layer processes over the Sahara from Fennec aircraft observations

Ryder, C L, McQuaid, J B, Flamant, C, Washington, R, Brindley, H E, Highwood, E J, Marsham, J H, Parker, D J, Todd, M C, Banks, J R, Brooke, J K, Engelstaedter, S, Estellés, V, Formenti, P, Garcia-Carreras, L, Kocha, C, Marenco, F, Rosenberg, P, Sodemann, H, Allen, C J T, Bourdon, A, Bart, M, Cavazos-Guerra, C, Chevaillier, S, Crosier, J, Darbyshire, E, Dean, A R, Dorsey, J R, Kent, J, O'Sullivan, D, Schepanski, K, Szpek, K and Woolley, A (2015) Advances in understanding mineral dust and boundary layer processes over the Sahara from Fennec aircraft observations. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions, 15 (1). pp. 199-290. ISSN 1680-7375

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Abstract

The Fennec climate program aims to improve understanding of the Saharan climate system through a synergy of observations and modelling. We present a description of the Fennec airborne observations during 2011 and 2012 over the remote Sahara (Mauritania and Mali) and the advances in the understanding of mineral dust and boundary layer processes they have provided. Aircraft instrumentation aboard the UK FAAM BAe146 and French SAFIRE Falcon 20 is described, with specific focus on instrumentation specially developed and relevant to Saharan meteorology and dust. Flight locations, aims and associated meteorology are described. Examples and applications of aircraft measurements from the Fennec flights are presented, highlighting new scientific results delivered using a synergy of different instruments and aircraft. These include: (1) the first airborne measurement of dust particles sized up to 300 microns and associated dust fluxes in the Saharan atmospheric boundary layer (SABL), (2) dust uplift from the breakdown of the nocturnal low-level jet before becoming visible in SEVIRI satellite imagery, (3) vertical profiles of the unique vertical structure of turbulent fluxes in the SABL, (4) in-situ observations of processes in SABL clouds showing dust acting as CCN and IN at −15 °C, (5) dual-aircraft observations of the SABL dynamics, thermodynamics and composition in the Saharan heat low region (SHL), (6) airborne observations of a dust storm associated with a cold-pool (haboob) issued from deep convection over the Atlas, (7) the first airborne chemical composition measurements of dust in the SHL region with differing composition, sources (determined using Lagrangian backward trajectory calculations) and absorption properties between 2011 and 2012, (8) coincident ozone and dust surface area measurements suggest coarser particles provide a route for ozone depletion, (9) discrepancies between airborne coarse mode size distributions and AERONET sunphotometer retrievals under light dust loadings. These results provide insights into boundary layer and dust processes in the SHL region – a region of substantial global climatic importance.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Global Studies > Geography
Research Centres and Groups: Sussex Sustainability Research Programme
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GB Physical geography
Depositing User: Jayne Paulin
Date Deposited: 21 Sep 2015 13:13
Last Modified: 15 Mar 2017 17:26
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/56847
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Project NameSussex Project NumberFunderFunder Ref
Fennec - The Saharan Climate SystemG0400NERC-NATURAL ENVIRONMENT RESEARCH COUNCILNE/G01826X/1