Chemoreception in human behaviour: experimental analysis of the social effects of fragrances

Kirk-Smith, M D and Booth, D A (1987) Chemoreception in human behaviour: experimental analysis of the social effects of fragrances. Chemical Senses, 12 (1). pp. 159-166. ISSN 0379-864X

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Abstract

Human responses to odour are acquired in complex settings, by association with emotionally significant effects. Odours thus help to carry the meaning of their sources, evoking recognition and affect. Olfactory discrimination between people involves elicitation of attitude, whether babies' maternal identification or adults' reactions to body odour and perfume. These effects are determined by the odorant's place in a whole stimulus array — which may include other odorants, a specific type of social situation and the perceiver's state of mind. The results of an experiment on the social effect of an odour will therefore depend critically on the test situation, procedure and instructions. We use these principles to resolve apparent conflicts in research findings and to point to implications for the formulation and advertising of personal fragrances.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Psychology > Psychology
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology > BF0180 Experimental psychology
B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology > BF0692 Psychology of sex. Sexual behavior
H Social Sciences > HM Sociology > HM1001 Social psychology
Q Science > QP Physiology > QP0351 Neurophysiology and neuropsychology > QP0431 Senses > QP0448 Special senses > QP0455 Chemical senses. Chemoreceptors
Depositing User: prof. David Booth
Date Deposited: 04 Sep 2015 08:42
Last Modified: 04 Sep 2015 08:42
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/56542
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