Can verbal instruction enhance the recall of an everyday task and promote error-monitoring in people with dementia of the Alzheimer-type?

Balouch, Sara and Rusted, Jennifer M (2015) Can verbal instruction enhance the recall of an everyday task and promote error-monitoring in people with dementia of the Alzheimer-type? Neuropsychological Rehabilitation, 27 (2). pp. 239-262. ISSN 0960-2011

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Abstract

People with dementia of the Alzheimer-type (DAT) have difficulties with performing everyday tasks and error awareness is poor. Here we investigated whether recall of actions and error monitoring in everyday task performance improved when they instructed another person on how to make tea. In this situation, both visual and motor cues are present, and attention sustained by the requirement to keep instructing. The data were drawn from a longitudinal study recording performance in four participants with DAT, filmed regularly for five years in their own homes, completing three tea-making conditions: performed-recall (they made tea themselves); instructed-recall (they instructed the experimenter on how to make tea); and verbal-recall (they described how to make tea). Accomplishment scores (percentage of task they correctly recalled), errors and error-monitoring were coded. Task accomplishment was comparable in the performed-recall and instructed-recall conditions, but both were significantly better than task accomplishment in the verbal-recall condition. Third person instruction did not improve error-monitoring. This study has implications for everyday task rehabilitation for people with DAT.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Psychology > Psychology
Brighton and Sussex Medical School > Neuroscience
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion
Depositing User: Lene Hyltoft
Date Deposited: 21 Aug 2015 11:07
Last Modified: 28 Jul 2017 01:34
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/56220

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