Flavour quality as cognitive psychology: the applied science of mental mechanisms relating flavour descriptions to chemical and physical stimulation patterns

Booth, D A (1994) Flavour quality as cognitive psychology: the applied science of mental mechanisms relating flavour descriptions to chemical and physical stimulation patterns. Food Quality and Preference, 5 (1-2). pp. 41-54. ISSN 0950-3293

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Abstract

While carrying out tasks such as describing a flavour or judging the distance of a sample from the top quality or standard quantities of that flavour, the assessor operates within a multidimensional space that has been set up by previous perceptual experience. The actual patterns of chemoreceptor stimulation by the test samples that are integrated into the assessor's scores are identifiable by their summation into sets of orthogonal discrimination scales that best account for scores on a particular response. Such cognitive measurement of the physicochemical bases of flavour quality is illustrated by tastant mixtures in foods and drinks, food aromas from mixtures of volatile compounds, identification of oritactile as well as chemosensory patterns in creamy flavour and interactions of flavour with nutritional information or bodily state.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Psychology > Psychology
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology > BF0180 Experimental psychology
Depositing User: prof. David Booth
Date Deposited: 31 Jul 2015 08:07
Last Modified: 31 Jul 2015 08:07
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/55878
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