Using the theory of planned behavior to identify key beliefs underlying chlamydia testing intentions in a sample of young people living in deprived areas

Booth, Amy R, Norman, Paul, Harris, Peter R and Goyder, Elizabeth (2015) Using the theory of planned behavior to identify key beliefs underlying chlamydia testing intentions in a sample of young people living in deprived areas. Journal of Health Psychology, 20 (9). pp. 1229-1239. ISSN 1359-1053

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Abstract

The Theory of Planned Behavior was used to identify the key behavioural, normative and control beliefs underlying intentions to test regularly for chlamydia among young people living in socially and economically deprived areas – a high-risk group for infection. Participants (N = 278, 53% male; mean age 17 years) were recruited from a vocational college situated in an area in the most deprived national quintile (England). Participants completed measures of behavioural, normative and control beliefs, plus intention to test regularly for chlamydia. The behavioural, normative and control beliefs most strongly correlated with intentions to test regularly for chlamydia were beliefs about stopping the spread of infection, partners’ behaviour and the availability of testing. These beliefs represent potential targets for interventions to increase chlamydia testing among young people living in deprived areas.

Item Type: Article
Schools and Departments: School of Psychology > Psychology
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion
Depositing User: Lene Hyltoft
Date Deposited: 30 Jul 2015 10:16
Last Modified: 07 Mar 2017 09:05
URI: http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/55834

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